2018 ASCB Doorstep Meeting

Separate registration & fee required
(Only available to ASCB members. Not a member? Join here)
Please contact Ashley Sarris with any questions.

Doorstep Meeting OverviewScheduleSpeaker DetailsRegistrationAbstractsCancellation PolicyHousing/TravelSupport Options

Meeting Overview

This doorstep symposium features leaders in stem cell biology who have studied mechanisms by which stem cells respond to stress. One of the most interesting areas of stem cell biology concerns the mechanisms by which stem cells withstand stresses such as tissue injury. So far, most studies of stem cell function have been in normal tissues. Less is known about the mechanisms that maintain stem cells in damaged tissues. Replicative stress and the need to regenerate differentiated cells can deplete stem cells, requiring the induction of distinct mechanisms that ensure stem cell persistence beyond homeostasis.

The meeting will provide an overview of the field, with significant time allotted for discussion and interaction between audience and speakers, with the goal of inspiring the ACSB community to tackle the cell biology of stem cells and tissue regeneration.  Elaine Fuchs, Rockefeller University, and Sean Morrison, UT Southwestern Medical Center, are the meeting organizers.

Students and postdocs who would like to explore opportunities in stem cell biology are encouraged to apply. There will be an opportunity for you to submit an abstract during the registration process. In addition to morning and afternoon poster sessions, multiple abstracts will be selected for short oral presentations. The deadline to submit an abstract is Wednesday, October 10.  Submitting an abstract does not guarantee it will be accepted.  

Doorstep Meeting Abstracts must be submitted separately from abstracts for the 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting!

Meeting Objectives

  1. To provide a concise overview of stem cell biology, as it pertains to cell biology research and tissue regeneration
  2. To illustrate how studies of the cell provide insights into stem cell research
  3. To encourage stem cell researchers to consider cell biology in their research
  4. To provide attendees and speakers opportunities to interact with each other in order to provide a more intimate and in-depth experience

This meeting is limited to the first 200 registrants, due to meeting space constraints.

Doorstep Meeting Schedule

Saturday, December 8, 2018
Ballroom 6 A/B, San Diego Convention Center, San Diego, CA

7:45 am Registration Opens
8:00 am Breakfast
8:35 – 8:45 am Welcome Remarks
8:40 – 9:10 am The Origin of New Cells in the Liver – Roel Nusse
9:10 – 9:40 am Mechanisms of Stem Cell Aging – Anne Brunet
9:40 – 10:00 am Poster Teasers
10:00 – 11:30 am AM Poster Session and Break
11:30 – 12:00 pm Out of Many, One: Collective Cell Dynamics During Organ Renewal– Lucy Erin O’Brien
12:00 – 1:20 pm Lunch w/ Roundtable Discussions
1:20- 1:50 pm Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells: Regeneration and Aging – Andrew Brack
1:50 – 2:20 pm Fat Cells as Active Participants in Tissue Regeneration– Valerie Horsley
2:20 – 2:40 pm Poster Teasers 
2:40 – 4:10 pm PM Poster Session
4:10 – 4:40 pm Top Abstract Presentations
4:40 – 5:10 pm Skin Stem Cells: Coping with Stress– Elaine Fuchs
5:10 – 5:15 pm Wrap – Up
6:00 pm Sean J. Morrison
Director of the Children’s Medical Center Research Institute (CRI) at UT Southwestern Medical Center 
2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting  Keynote Lecture
(keynote admission included with Doorstep Meeting registration)

*subject to change

Speaker Details

 Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells: Regeneration and Aging 

 Andrew Brack, University of California, San Francisco 

The ability of stem cells to survive and maintain function during tissue turnover and stress is a key determinant of long-term regenerative success. Skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs) lose fitness under contexts of high stress including aging, muscular disease and irradiation (IR). Hence there is a critical need to identify the properties that maintain or enhance stress resistance. In this talk I will discuss our studies that uncover molecular and functional heterogeneity within the MuSC pool and the molecular programs that endow subsets with stress-resistance. 

 

Mechanisms of Stem Cell Aging

 Anne Brunet, Stanford University

Aging is accompanied by a decline in tissue regeneration in mammals. In the nervous system, neural stem cells are thought to be critical for learning and memory. During aging, both the pool of neural stem cells and their ability to give rise to new neurons decline. Thus, neural stem cell decline may underlie age-dependent cognitive deterioration. However, the mechanisms that promote a youthful neural stem cell pool are largely unknown. Epigenetic changes in chromatin states may be particularly important in aging neural stem cells. We have previously shown that conserved chromatin modifiers of the COMPASS family, which is responsible for trimethylation of lysine 4 on histone H3 (H3K4me3), regulate longevity in the worm C. elegans. We are currently characterizing epigenetic changes, specifically changes in H3K4me3, in neural stem cells in aging mouse cohorts. We used next-generation sequencing to identify the genome-wide distribution of H3K4me3 in young and old adult neural stem cells. By directly purifying young and old neural stem cells, we have also examined coding and non-coding RNAs in aging neural stem cells. This global analysis has provided key insights into how this chromatin mark may promote youthful neural stem cell function. The knowledge of the epigenetic network controlling adult neural stem cell homeostasis might help counter brain aging in long-lived species, including humans.

 

Skin Stem Cells: Coping with Stress

Elaine Fuchs, Rockefeller University/HHMI

Adult tissue stem cells have the ability to self-renew long term and differentiate into one or more tissues. Many stem cells are used sparingly to replenish cells during normal homeostasis. However, even stem cells that are quiescent must be able to respond quickly to injury in order to fuel rapid tissue regeneration. How stem cells balance self-renewal and differentiation is of fundamental importance to our understanding of normal tissue maintenance and wound repair. The regulatory circuitry governing this normal balancing act is must be intricately regulated in normal homeostasis, and then transiently altered to cope with injury responses. Increasing evidence suggests that the mechanism goes awry in inflammation and becomes hijacked in cancers.

We use skin epithelium is an excellent model system to understand how stem cells remain quiescent during times of minimal wear and tear, how these cells become mobilized during the cyclical bouts of hair growth and wound-repair, and how the normal process of stem cell activation goes awry in cancer and inflammation. We’ve identified and characterized at a molecular level the skin’s stem cells and shown that they reside in distinct niches that impart to the stem cells their behavior both in task and in the molecular properties they display. We use high throughput genetic and genomic approaches to dissect at a molecular level how stem cell interactions with their niches differ in homeostasis, wound repair and inflammation, and how heterogeneity in the tumor microenvironment can confer to stem cells resistance to chemotherapy.  Our global objective is to apply our knowledge of the basic science of epithelial stem cells to unfold new avenues for therapeutics.

 

 Fat Cells as Active Participants in Tissue Regeneration

 Valerie Horsley, Yale University

Adipose tissue is composed of multiple cell types including mature lipid-filled adipocytes that store lipid in the form of triglycerides, immature mesenchymal precursor cells and immune cells. The stroma of the epithelial tissues, skin and mammary gland, is filled with mature adipocytes and adipose tissue is often manipulated and applied to plastic surgery procedures to improve wound healing and impact scarring.  However, the mechanisms that underlie these benefits is not clear.  I will discuss our recent work exploring how cells within the adipocyte lineage support tissue regeneration in the skin and mammary gland.  I will describe how adipocytes function as active participants in tissue repair processes by both releasing and capturing lipid.  I will show how adipocytes are essential for tissue regeneration and renewal of epithelial tissues after damage and/or tissue remodeling.

 

  The Origin of New Cells in the Liver 

  Roel Nusse, Stanford University, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Our laboratory is interested in the growth, development and integrity of animal tissues, with a focus on stem cells. Wnt signaling is widely implicated in stem cell control, as a mechanism to regulate the number of stem cells in tissues, Using various cell labeling and lineage tracing methods, we have described novel populations of stem cells in various tissues, including in the liver. In that tissue, we found that hepatocytes that reside in the pericentral domain of the liver demonstrate stem cell behavior. Although these cells are functional hepatocytes, they are diploid and thus differ from the mostly polyploid mature hepatocyte population. They are active in homeostatic cell replacement. Adjacent central vein endothelial cells provide the essential source of Wnt signals for the hepatocyte stem cells and thereby constitute the liver stem cell niche.

 

Out of Many, One: Collective Cell Dynamics During Organ Renewal

Lucy Erin O’Brien, Stanford University

Healthy organ function requires that organ form be continually renewed, remodeled, and repaired. These activities depend on resident stem cells, which sense the dynamic needs of the organ and adjust their outputs accordingly. However for lifelong tissue homeostasis, the particular outputs of individual stem cells must be collectively coordinated at the whole-organ level. How does this collective, self-enforcing dynamic emerge? I will discuss our findings regarding homeostatic control of two elemental organ features: cell number and cell patterning.

 

 

 

Registration

Separate Registration & Fee Required for the 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting.

You must be an ASCB member to attend the 2018 ASCB Doorstep Meeting.  Not a member?  Join Now.

If you attend both the 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting and the 2018 ASCB Doorstep Meeting, the Doorstep Meeting cost is discounted 30%*.  The discount only applies to fully paid registrants of the 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting.

 Member Rates*

 Discounted Registration

 (If registered for the 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting*)      

 Regular Registration

  (If NOT registered for the 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting)

ASCB Regular Member $182 $260
ASCB Postdoctoral Member $161 $230
ASCB Graduate Student Member $133 $190
ASCB Undergraduate Student Member $133 $190

*Please Note: In order to get the discount you have to either:

  1. Already be registered for the 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting
  2. Register for the 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting and the 2018 ASCB Doorstep Meeting at the same time

If you register for the 2018 ASCB Doorstep Meeting, then go back and register for the 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting you will NOT get the discount.

See Cancellation to learn about the cancellation policy.

Abstracts

How to Submit an Abstract for the Doorstep Meeting (Separate from ASCB|EMBO Abstract Submission)

To submit an abstract for the meeting, you will need to register for the Doorstep Meeting in order to submit an abstract for the Doorstep Meeting.  Follow the blue link above to do so.

Once you have registered for the meeting. click the button below to submit your abstract. The abstract submission deadline is Wednesday, October 10.

You will be requested to fill in the following fields:

  • Abstract Title (200 max characters)
  • Abstract Authors (1,000 max characters)
  • Abstract body (2,800 max characters)

You will also be asked if you wish to be considered for one of the two talks selected from abstracts, or one of eight poster teasers (3 minute presentations with one slide to gain excitement about your poster before the poster session).

If you need to make edits to your abstract prior to the October 10 deadline, click on the submit abstract button above and make any changes you have. Be sure to click Submit at the bottom to ensure your changes are saved. Edits can be made until 11:59 pm EST on October 10.

Abstract disposition will be sent the week of October 29.

Please note: Your abstract will only be reviewed if you are registered for the meeting by October 10. 

Cancellation Policy

Meeting registration is nontransferable. Meeting registration is nonrefundable after November 19, 2018. The organizers will honor requests for refunds if they are in writing and are received by the ASCB no later than November 19. Please note that cancellations are subject to a processing fee of $20 for students and $40 for all others. No refunds will be issued for requests received after November 19. Please send a request for cancellation to asarris@ascb.org.

Please Note: Registration refunds will not be issued after November 19 for denied Visas.

Housing & Travel

The 2018 ASCB Doorstep Meeting: Beyond Homeostasis: Stem Cells Under Stress is being held in conjunction with the 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting in San Diego, California. The links below will lead you to the Housing and Travel pages on the 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting site.

ASCB encourages you to take advantage of the great rates secured for the 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting in San Diego and book within the ASCB room block.

Click on the designated link below for more information on the following:

Support Opportunities

Beyond Homeostasis: Stem Cells Under Stress 
ASCB Doorstep Meeting
Held in conjunction with 2018 ASCB/EMBO Meeting
San Diego, CA, December 8, 2018

Beyond Homeostasis: Stem Cells Under Stress ASCB Doorstep Meeting will be held on Saturday, December 8, 2018—the first day of the ASCB | EMBO Meeting, in San Diego.

This doorstep symposium features leaders in stem cell biology who have studied mechanisms by which stem cells respond to stress. One of the most interesting areas of stem cell biology concerns the mechanisms by which stem cells withstand stresses such as tissue injury. So far, most studies of stem cell function have been in normal tissues. Less is known about the mechanisms that maintain stem cells in damaged tissues. Replicative stress and the need to regenerate differentiated cells can deplete stem cells, requiring the induction of distinct mechanisms that ensure stem cell persistence beyond homeostasis.

The meeting will provide an overview of the field, with significant time allotted for discussion and interaction between audience and speakers, with the goal of inspiring the ACSB community to tackle the cell biology of stem cells and tissue regeneration.  Elaine Fuchs, Rockefeller University, and Sean Morrison, UT Southwestern Medical Center, are the meeting organizers.

 

This is a great opportunity to engage with this focused community. Make sure your company is visible by supporting the Doorstep Meeting with one of the following options:

 Gold 25K  Silver 15K  Bronze 5K
Acknowledgment by the meeting chair from the dais and on signage throughout the meeting.
Complimentary registrations for the Doorstep Meeting 3 2 1
Complimentary mailing list of Doorstep Meeting attendees (postal addresses only)  
Opportunity to place literature on table in the meeting room (200 pieces max)    
Acknowledgment in Doorstep Meeting Program and website, on signage at the 2017 ASCB/EMBO Meeting, and in the ASCB Newsletter
Gold Support – $25,000
  1. Acknowledgment by the meeting chair from the dais
  2. Supporter’s name on signage at the meeting and by registration
  3. Three complimentary registrations for the Doorstep Meeting
  4. Complimentary mailing list for Doorstep Meeting attendees (postal addresses only)
  5. Opportunity to place Literature on table in the meeting room (100 pieces max)
  6. Acknowledgment in Doorstep Meeting Program and website, on signage at the 2018 ASCB|EMBO Meeting, and in the ASCB Newsletter
Silver Support – $15,000
  1. Acknowledgment by the meeting chair from the dais
  2. Supporter’s name on signage at the meeting and by registration
  3. Two complimentary registrations for the Doorstep Meeting
  4. Complimentary mailing list for Doorstep Meeting attendees (postal addresses only)
  5. Acknowledgment in Doorstep Meeting Program and website, on signage at the 2018 ASCB|EMBO Meeting, and in the ASCB Newsletter
Bronze Support – $5,000
  1. Acknowledgment by the meeting chair from the dais
  2. Supporter’s name on signage at the meeting and by registration
  3. One complimentary registration for the Doorstep Meeting
  4. Acknowledgment in Doorstep Meeting Program and website, on signage at the 2018 ASCB|EMBO Meeting, and in the ASCB Newsletter

If you would like to support the Doorstep Meeting in a different manner than listed above, please contact SPARGO, Inc., Exhibit, Sponsorship and Advertising Sales and Management, or call 1-703-631-6200 or 1-800-564-4220. We are always interested in your suggestions!

 

Special Thanks To: